Warty Corallimorph

Below me was a large mat of beautiful underwater flowers. I put my hand over the golden wart like tentacles that radiated out from the center and felt the rubbery texture. Puzzled, I could not identify what this critter was. It looked like an anemone but the pattern told me it might be something else. I motioned to Mary and pointed, she gave me this I do not know shrug and placed her hand over the tentacles. I took out my slate and wrote “anemone?” and she shook her head with a look of uncertainty so I took a couple of quick photos to identify it when we got home.

We were diving with Kay Wilson of Indigo Dive St. Vincent at “The Steps”. This dive site is next to the shore of St. Vincent at an ancient (relatively speaking) spot where islanders would come to bath and throw their trash out. You might find a treasure of trash sunk into the sand like old bottles but more than likely, you will find a wealth of critters on this dive.

Diamond Rock

At a certain point in the day the rays of the sun glisten off this diamond shaped rock and you can literally see how it got it's name. On closer inspection the substance reflecting the rays of the sun is bird poop.

The World Looks Very Different From Up Here

Why do I stand up here? Anybody?...I stand upon my desk to remind yourself that we must constantly look at things in a different way.

Back Side of Middle Cay


Concentrating on framing a shot of a sand diver I heard a faint yet familiar sound off in the distance. Looking around somewhat bewildered about where it was coming from I looked over at Mary but she was busy searching for a critter with the beam of her light. Then I heard it again, louder yet still distant. I got Mary’s attention and pointed my finger to my ear and she looked at me with a puzzled look. I swam over to her and wrote on my slate “whale song”. She beamed a smile and began searching the abyss for any sign of the behemoths.

Sharptail Eel

Slithering along the bottom bobbing its head side to side as if sniffing a scent the sharptail eel hunts its prey. Oblivious to our presence it charges forward at a fast speed apparently sensing or smelling a meal. I move my leg as it dodges under me, it is fully intent on catching some invisible prey. Stopping abruptly just below me it sticks its head, with those tubular nostrils, in a small hole but quickly loses interest and slithers on toward another opportunity.